ThePigSite.com - news, features, articles and disease information for the swine industry

Dominant and Recessive Genes for Color

Hello, 

So I have four sows and they are all a York/Exotic Hamp cross (Blue Butt). I bred one to a pure Hamp, one to a pure Duroc, and the other two to a Blue Butt. They just pigged this last week and... all of my pigs are blue butts. I've been doing some research on dominant and recessive genes / genotypes and pheontypes, but I am having some trouble finding a solid answer to the situation (I know that genetics can be very complex). What do I need to do in order to end up with red or black pigs? I realize there is no physical way to determine which piglets carry a colored gene other than the color that they actually are. Please help.

Thanks!

Comments

  • blonde Senior Member
    you a red pig involved to get a red piglet

     if you cross a white with a blue butt you will get all blue butts but if you add a red to it you will get red butts blue butts and whites
  • Stevie G Super Moderator

    Hi All, first sow will be 75% Hampshire, 25 % York, the next would be 50% Duroc,  25 % York and 25% Hampshire and the last would be 50 % York 50% Hampshire.

    As Blonde states the duroc cross will be the odd one out with ginger  in colour.

  • blonde Senior Member
    been breeding red saddles for 20 years...... when a  white is a dam and a brown/red is a sire you will get the whites making up most of the colour and the colour and the minor colour will be ginger....... that being the case it can be a saddle and it may only be one in the litter.....and it can be a sow or a boar..... the colour can be full or spots or partial..... the white being the majority is all white with no colour at all.
    so breeding a new breed with the minor colour can be a bit of work but HEY we have achieved it...20 years on..... now we have the Australian Red Saddle Back....!!!!!!!

Sign In or Register to comment.

Our Sponsors

Partners


Seasonal Picks

Animal Welfare Science, Husbandry and Ethics: The Evolving Story of Our Relationship with Farm Animals