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Pmws

Laterhosen Junior Member
edited October 2015 in PMWS and PDNS
This is my first year raising pigs, and i dont know a whole lot about them. I have yet to get them, as their breeder keeps changing the date. I think they're at least 8 weeks old. Today I was able to visit them, and they all looked weak/sick. They had what looked like purple ink on their rear ends, and the mother also had some inside her ear. The farm owner did not have time to come to the pig pen with me so he gave me permission to peek at them on my own. Their pen was also quite due for cleaning...I did a little googling and kept seeing "pmws". What questions should I be asking the farmer? If the piglets have been sick should I not buy them? If I get piglets from anyone, are there vaccines I should be getting for them? (Pmws or not) I may just be paranoid but I've had a weird gut feeling prior to me noticing them seeming weak. Any advice would be appreciated!

Comments

  • karlos Junior Member
    edited May 2013
    I would steer well clear of them- if you think they are sick......they probably are, its hard enough preventing diseases from entering a herd without buying it in
  • Stevie G Super Moderator
    edited May 2013
    Laterhosen said:
    This is my first year raising pigs, and i dont know a whole lot about them. I have yet to get them, as their breeder keeps changing the date. I think they're at least 8 weeks old. Today I was able to visit them, and they all looked weak/sick. They had what looked like purple ink on their rear ends, and the mother also had some inside her ear. The farm owner did not have time to come to the pig pen with me so he gave me permission to peek at them on my own. Their pen was also quite due for cleaning...I did a little googling and kept seeing "pmws". What questions should I be asking the farmer? If the piglets have been sick should I not buy them? If I get piglets from anyone, are there vaccines I should be getting for them? (Pmws or not) I may just be paranoid but I've had a weird gut feeling prior to me noticing them seeming weak. Any advice would be appreciated!

    I've worked on a piggery with PMWS and it didn't effect pigs of this age like this.
    And as Carlos says, if they look sick don't buy them.

    Post weaning Multisystemic wasting syndrome is what PMWS stands for and that is exactly what happens, individual pigs waste away after weaning so the problem they have at this it is something else and I will say it against " let well alone".
  • blonde Senior Member
    edited May 2013
    Laterhosen said:
    This is my first year raising pigs, and i dont know a whole lot about them. I have yet to get them, as their breeder keeps changing the date. I think they're at least 8 weeks old. Today I was able to visit them, and they all looked weak/sick. They had what looked like purple ink on their rear ends, and the mother also had some inside her ear. The farm owner did not have time to come to the pig pen with me so he gave me permission to peek at them on my own. Their pen was also quite due for cleaning...I did a little googling and kept seeing "pmws". What questions should I be asking the farmer? If the piglets have been sick should I not buy them? If I get piglets from anyone, are there vaccines I should be getting for them? (Pmws or not) I may just be paranoid but I've had a weird gut feeling prior to me noticing them seeming weak. Any advice would be appreciated!
    bringing in sick pigs only raises more issues on your farm with more sick pigs spreading disease to the rest of your herd. Leave them there and the farmer needs to do something about his sick stock, but that is not your problem. it is his. pigs being pigs they will spread it from one end of the piggery to the other and with your help via your boots and their manure it will be real easy to make your pigs sick...
  • matthepet Junior Member
    edited October 2014
    Unique to PMWS is the presence of intensely basophilic staining inclusion bodies on H & E sections. The intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies can be noted in most tissues, but are most prominent in the lymph nodes, tonsils, and Peyer's patches of the ileum. The inclusion bodies appear to be clusters of porcine circovirus, according to EM and other tests.
  • Mountain Junior Member
    edited October 2015
    I have always bought my feeder hogs at the sale yard, I go take a look at them before the sale begins, any that even strike me as potentially sick I do not bid on. In all the hogs I have bought this way I have lost three over the years, two of which were $10 rupture hogs so I expected a high likelyhood that they would not make it. I have only had one apparent healthy hog die raising them up.

    The sale yard is not the greatest way to buy them, you don't see what they have been fed, the environment they lived in, the care they have received etc, but you can get a pretty good idea of general health by looking at them before the sale.

    You can also buy them for $40 to $55 each at the sale yard here usually and you can buy pretty large quantities if desired. You might check on your local sale yards and go to a couple and see what stock is going through there. Good luck on your venture... The best meat I have ever eaten was the hogs that we have raised, feeding them boiled lentil/wheat, barley mash from a local micro brewery, grass and a bit of cracked corn.....mmmmmmmmm meat like you cannot buy in any store....

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