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Nose contact

David Jembuk Junior Member
edited February 2011 in "Off Your Chest"
We all agree that pigs are cute. But have you ever tried to do nose contact with your boar?
I have, at first I only touch their nose, rub their neck, let them chew my hand a little, and one day (don't ask me why) I do nose contact with my boar (and do a quick kiss on his nose).
But I don't do this anymore because I'm worried about disease transmission. not to me, but to them. :D

Comments

  • Stevie G Super Moderator
    edited February 2011
    I would be very worried that it may be the other way round at this present moment in time, so would discontinue doing it, especially if it is Brucellocis.
    This can be passed on to humans and is very difficult to get rid of in any species!!!!!!!!!
  • Stevie G Super Moderator
    edited February 2011
    Wouldn't have very big tusks at 2 years old Blonde.
    The boars on your farm don't get much time to have a mature life, do they Blonde????????:D
    Of am I wrong once a gain!!!!:confused:
  • Stevie G Super Moderator
    edited February 2011
    Better to be safe than sorry, hey Blonde!!!!:rolleyes:
  • David Jembuk Junior Member
    edited February 2011
    Stevie G said:
    I would be very worried that it may be the other way round at this present moment in time, so would discontinue doing it, especially if it is Brucellocis.
    This can be passed on to humans and is very difficult to get rid of in any species!!!!!!!!!
    Will try to stay clean and keep my eyes on them, so far have tried penicilin and amoxi, with additional anti-inflam (started yesterday), also tried tiamulin and OTC as Blonde's advice. will see the progress within a month (hopefully).
    Will stop the treatment if there are no further progress. I'm worried that my other boars will be infected too.
  • David Jembuk Junior Member
    edited February 2011
    blonde said:
    Not only that, the boar flicks his head around really quickly and cuts you to shreds with his sharp tusks. I would say very silly from both points of view.
    Yes they have sharp tusks and very active, but I don't think they ever show any aggressive behavior to me. But thanks for the warning.
  • Stevie G Super Moderator
    edited February 2011
    Have been doing more reading on the disease and all medical advice is saying that drugs do not cure the problem and best is to cull out your herd, disinfect and start again. Something you probably don't wont to here!!!
    As Blonde says, best is to get a definite diagnoses to see what the precise problem is and make a decision from there.
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