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Castrating new born pigs?

Zuriel Member
edited February 2011 in General Pig Health
i have some questions concerning castrating new born pigs.

how old should the pig be?
what kind of antibiotics (name) do i use after surgery?

Comments

  • Galapas Senior Member
    edited February 2011
    We castrated our pigs at 6 weeks but my husband wants to try to do the next batch at 5 weeks. We used no antibiotics because none of them got infections after the castration. And we didn't put anything on the incisions because my husband read it's best not to. The incisions started to close the next day and in less than a week were completely healed.
  • David Jembuk Junior Member
    edited February 2011
    we usually do it in 4-5 weeks, and pour betadine or other iodine-antiseptics on the wounds. usually heal them in 5-7 days after the surgery. so I guess its fine for you to do it in 5 weeks.
  • Galapas Senior Member
    edited February 2011
    Two important things I forgot to mention - make sure Mama Pig is secured in her stall while you're castrating the piglets and wear ear defendors!
  • Stevie G Super Moderator
    edited February 2011
    Castration can be done when you iron, teeth and tail(but you really need to know what you are doing) up to generally 14 days. I certainly wouldn't leave them any longer, simply because at a younger age they are easier to handle.
    All incisions should be sprayed, with iodine, Chloramide, Terrymicin, etc.
    I supposed at the end of the day its pertsonal preference!!!!!:D
  • Zuriel Member
    edited February 2011
    i read from http://www.ehow.com/how_2111659_properly-castrate-baby-pig.html and it state 3-5 days is a good age?
    and after how long should i ween the piglets?
    when is it safe for a sow to be pregnant again, after having a litter?
  • I8Iggy Senior Member
    edited February 2011
    If you have a spray antibodic like along the lines of Bluecoat, I would coat them after you done them and then recoat as needed. Try to make sure that their bedding in kept clean and dry.
  • Galapas Senior Member
    edited February 2011
    Unless you have someone helping you who is experienced in castrating piglets I would not do them that young. I think weaning depends on your set-up and how quickly you want your sow to become pregnant again. As well you have to make sure that the piglets are eating and drinking enough on their own. This was our first litter so we are still learning as we go along. We weaned our piglets at 10 weeks and our sow became pregnant within a week. We only have a small set up (three females and one boar so far, along with our six finishers) but I think with our next litter we will try weaning them at eight weeks. We don't clip teeth and tails and since our pigs are pasture raised we don't need to give them iron injections. They were outside eating dirt about three days after they were born.
  • David Jembuk Junior Member
    edited February 2011
    I usually wean the piglet at 8 weeks age. Sow should be mated at 4-5 days after the piglet weaned.
  • Stevie G Super Moderator
    edited February 2011
    Most decisions of castration are based on what your regular routines are. ie if you give baytril at 4 days then do castration at the same time, doing the castration first and the Baytril after, and so on.
    Hope we haven't confused the pants off you!!!!!:D
  • Stevie G Super Moderator
    edited February 2011
    No wonder your home so late, as you start to late, hey Blonde.
    10 am, what ever next!!!!!!:D :D
  • Stevie G Super Moderator
    edited February 2011
    Its something that I have never had to worry about in Oz as I have never done castration over here but used to use improvac instead, so I will take your word for it.:D I mainly did castration in America and Switzerland and they were both indoor units, so heat was never an issue which was just as well as it was a 3200 sow Unit.
  • Debandpat Junior Member
    edited February 2011
    Hi, Do you have to castrate, is there anyone who rears for meat and doesn't castrate if so what age do you take to the butcher???:(
  • Stevie G Super Moderator
    edited February 2011
    No there is no need to castrate, it just depends what weight your growing your pig to.
    I used to sell at 106kg(heavy end) which meant my pigs required either castration or the use of improvac(an double injection)which was what we used.
    I think that upto 90kg is acceptable before you need to castrate.
    And of course it depends on what market your selling to.:D
  • Galapas Senior Member
    edited February 2011
    You may also want to read up on "boar taint".
  • Zuriel Member
    edited February 2011
    as far as new born piglets, I'm very inexperienced. so besides castration. what should i do after it's born? and how do i know if it's a male or female within the week?
    Do note that our farm does it's best to "go back to the beginning" more of the natural way. so if there is a healthier way, please share some thoughts.
  • hairyhogs Junior Member
    edited February 2011
    Hi there, my 'tuppenceworth', I paid a vet to castrate our two 'pet' Tamworths Ronnie & Reggie, the mission was accomplished with minimum discomfort to the boys:rolleyes:

    They soon recovered from their ordeal, and dont hate me for it!!!:D

    I was worried about infections too, and the Aussie vet Chris assured me they'd be fine, he was right................I then found out it was hisfirst ever castration on a pig!!!:eek:

    Sorry if this is a bit off the serious note of the thread, but it is vaguely relevant I guess.

    Regards
    Jas.
    www.hairyhogs.co.uk
  • pintsizeporkers Junior Member
    edited February 2011
    Zuriel said:
    i have some questions concerning castrating new born pigs.

    how old should the pig be?
    what kind of antibiotics (name) do i use after surgery?
    We wait until the piglets are between 10 - 14 days to ensure that they are strong enough to cope with it. we have our vet pop out and do it for us, the cut is left open and no antibiotics are given to the piglet. I have not had any problems or infections.
  • Johnstons Junior Member
    edited February 2011
    We are castrating ours earlier this year (couple of weeks old) and it's going a LOT better. Pigs are easier to handle. Just have your helper hold one front and back leg in right hand, the others in left hand. Piglets back resting on their chest. We also spray with iodine (betadine) when done.

    Good luck!

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